Chevy

Prairie Gold Task Force

 

A GB model Minneapolis Moline tractor in signature 'Prairie Gold' paint and a Task Force Chevy grain truck sit together in retirement.

The Minneapolis Moline GB was built in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 1955 until 1959. Priced at $5000USD the two-wheel drive tractor weighed 7100 pounds. The GB came equipped with a liquid-cooled 6.6 liter four cylinder rated for 71 horsepower at 1300RPM.

Chevrolet and General Motors introduced their all new light trucks – the Task Force series in March of 1955. Borrowing from passenger car styling, the new GM’s smooth sheet metal, hooded headlights and wrap around windshield (an industry first) gave them a contemporary look. Along with the drastic styling changes, 1955 saw many new options introduced for GM trucks. For the first time, power steering, power brakes, a 12 volt electrical system, an overdrive unit, and a 265 cubic inch V8 were available. Buyers still had the option of sticking with the venerable stovebolt six which had been in use since 1929.

1958 saw a redesign of the front end sheet metal; quad headlights were introduced. The first fleetside boxes became available, and factory air conditioning was found in Chevy trucks for the first time. The Task Force body style was manufactured until 1959.

1937 Chevrolet Master

 

A blackbird sits perched on this 1937 Chevrolet Master, taking in another spectacular prairie sunset.

For the 1937 model year Chevrolet introduced it's most complete redesign since 1929. Bodies were wider, roomier and now made completely of steel marking the departure from using wood in the body's construction. The Chevrolet is a 5 passenger sedan with trunk that cost $817 when new. It was equipped with the 216 cubic inch Blue Flame inline six cylinder that made 85 horsepower. The Master Deluxe model cost $70 more than the Master. Upgrades included dual taillights, two windshield wipers, better upholstery, an engine temperature gauge, a lower axle ratio, and most notable was the 'knee action' independent front suspension. This was the last body style where cars and trucks shared a similar appearance.

While working under America's Car Design Pioneer, Harley Earl, Jules Agramonte and Lewis Simon were responsible for the 1937 (and '38) Chevrolet's styling. Understated details made the Chevrolet stand out from its competitors. The 'diamond crown speedline', a body crease sweeping back from the front fenders down into the doors, gave the car an extended body look. The 1937 Chevys are still considered some of the most beautiful cars ever made.